BC to Invest in More Tourism Infrastructure Including Indigenous Campground Development

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More than 50 new tourism-related projects across British Columbia (Canada) will receive CA$21.3 million for shovel-ready infrastructure projects.

The projects are an element of the second phase of the 2021 Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program’s (CERIP) Destination Development stream, according to a press release.

In February 2021, in response to the pandemic through StrongerBC, the province provided CA$20 million to 54 tourism-related projects in the initial phase of CERIP.

The second round of investment in the amount of CA$21.3 million in 2022 is double the amount, resulting in an overall amount of CA41.3 million to the tourism industry with over 100 initiatives.

“We know tourism infrastructure is a priority for communities. Today, we are responding to this call to action from the sector that will further support its recovery efforts from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Melanie Mark, minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture, and Sport.

“Our investment in tourism creates good-paying jobs that directly support local economies now and will elevate our reputation as a world-class destination for the many visitors looking to return to B.C. for years to come.”

The Province has committed another CA$30 million in the coming two years to build tourism infrastructure across the province. By helping communities enhance tourism experiences, B.C. can increase its capacity to be a top destination.

These funds will boost tourism development and create new opportunities for tourism, which will help in the growth of B.C.’s post-pandemic tourism economy.

Continued investment in destination development will boost the number of jobs and employment opportunities and help create more sustainable communities while increasing the quality of life of residents as well as the experiences of visitors.

The investments in implementation-ready tourism infrastructure projects will aid in the development and sustainability of tourism by creating employment and building infrastructure that attracts visitors to B.C. localities in the near and long term.

Approved projects include an Indigenous campground development, trail upgrades to accommodate adapted mountain bikes and wheelchairs, arts and culture event space, and beautification and signage projects.

Projects were selected based on the benefits they have shown the communities and British Columbians and new jobs, many of which will employ apprentices, youth, new Canadians, women, and Indigenous Peoples. Eligible applicants included local governments, First Nations, and non-profit organizations.

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